Category: Design

The winning entry to build China’s Pavilion at the Milan Expo 2015 goes to…

The winning entry to build China’s Pavilion at the Milan Expo 2015 is a stunning reinterpretation of a public space. Designed in collaboration between Tsinghua University and New York-based Studio Link-Arc, the duo rejected the notion of a typical pavilion, and instead came up with a structure that resembles billowing fields of wheat. It’s a thoughtful and creative twist on the Expo’s theme, “Feeding the Planet – Energy for Life.” According to the architects, the 5,000-square-meter space entitledLand of Hope is centered around the idea that, “hope can be realized when nature and the city exist in harmony.”

The Pavilion’s floating roof plays a large role in capturing the spirit of the Expo. Conceptually, the undulating form merges the city skyline to the building’s north with the natural landscape to the south. It’s designed as a timber structure that references the raised-beam system found in traditional Chinese architecture, and is clad in bamboo shingled panels to reference the country’s terracotta roof construction.

Inside, there will be exhibitions and cultural offerings from the 40 Chinese provinces. The centerpiece of it all is the “field of hope,” a multimedia installation that’s a landscape of LED “stalks” meant to mimic the form of wheat. After visitors have taken in the Pavilion’s sights, sounds, and short films, they can stand on a raised platform outside and enjoy the expansive views of the Expo’s grounds.

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Artist Creates Surreal Pictures With Shelter Animals To Help Find Them New Homes

Talented Hungarian photographer Sarolta Ban is back with more of her distinctive surreal images, but this time there’s a noble purpose behind her work – each image is meant to portray a shelter animal in a new light and help them find a loving home.

Everything seems to have begun with one image of a white dog that, according to Ban’s Facebook, she adopted. She went on to create a whole series of images featuring furry friends that are looking for homes.

She also started collecting images of animals from all over the world that are looking for homes. She plans to create beautiful images for them as well, and will gift copies of these beautiful images to the people that choose to adopt them.

“Abandoned dogs sadly have really few chances to appear on a photo that will help them get out of the shelter… [one] that stands out from the crowd, and ‘speaks’ to a person,” she explains on the project’s page.

If you enjoy her artwork, be sure to check out her page as well and buy a print or even get acquainted with a new furry friend!

Architecture the Great! Office in Madrid helps employees feel apart of Great Mother nature.

It looks like something from the future but its 2014, its about time architecture looked as futuristic as this.

The brilliant aaerodynamic window tubed office, designed by Spanish architects Jose Selgas and Lucia Cano, allows its workers to feel as though they’re working in the middle of a Spanish forest. (This would have been the perfect back drop for the editors of Pans Labrynth).

Half of the office, which the two architects designed for their architecture firm Selgascano, is dug into the ground in a forest outside of Madrid. This ensures that the office stays cool even during the hot Spanish summers avoiding the feeling of being stuck in a green house.

A long window that curves up to the ceiling runs along the length of the office and eliminates the need for artificial lighting during the day. This window is also attached to a hinge and pulley mechanism that allows it to open up and keep the building ventilated. The other half of the building features an insulated fiberglass wall that helps shade the office’s workers from direct sunlight.

The office building’s sunken floor, along with the large and unusual window, means that employees sitting at their desks have an eye-level view of the forest floor. This is a company that really loves their employees!

This, combined with the view of the forest on one side and the sky above, make it seem like the office must be a fairly relaxing place to work.

Warning!! These are not paintings!!

Warning!! These are not paintings!!

What you are about to see, are not paintings on canvas! Alexa Meade paints with acrylics directly on human flesh creating the illusion of painterly portraits.

“Alexa Meade is an installation artist based in the Washington, DC area. Her background in the world of political communications has fueled her intellectual interest in the tensions between perception and reality.

Alexa Meade’s innovative use of paint on the three dimensional surfaces of found objects, live models, and architectural spaces has been incorporated into a series of installations that create a perceptual shift in how we experience and interpret spatial relationships.” (from her BIO)

Daredevils Building Human Towers in Catalonia, Spain

Daredevils Building Human Towers in Catalonia, Spain

Every time you see a crowd of Catalans gathered in one place, a strike or a riot is the safest guess, however sometimes it might mean a different and truly spectacular thing. What turned out to be a typical way to celebrate any bigger occasion, doesn’t get any more impressive than in the Concurs de Castells (“competition of castles” in Catalan), where hundreds of people compete in who will form a bigger one.

The competition is held in Tarragona every two years and attracts over 20 000 viewers. Last year 32 teams participated, each one consisting from 100 to 500 members. The towers reach from 6 to 10 levels in hight, and are built from men, women and children alike. The usual way is to keep the male team members (and the heavier ones at that) at the bottom, while women and children go up to form the top levels. In order to win the competition, the complexity of the tower is judged as well as its hight.

With the“Strength, balance, courage and common sense” slogan serving as the moto of the tradition, human towers have been recognized as the UNESCO cultural heritage in 2010, and have been considered as one of the most important Catalan traditions for over 200 years now. Below are some stunning shots by David Oliete, capturing the magnitude of the event!

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Artist Uses Own Hand as Canvas for Fairy Tale Illustrations

Artist Uses Own Hand as Canvas for Fairy Tale Illustrations

Russian musician and painter Svetlana Kolosova uses her own hand as her canvas as she paints charming little scenes inspired by fairy tales. The Moscow-based artist’s series of hand paintings, roughly translated as Palm Drawings, include a range of stories from classic Hans Christian Andersen tales like The Little Mermaid and The Little Match Girl to Russian folklore like The Snow Maiden, all in beautifully vivid colors.

The multifaceted artist accounts for the lines and ridges of the human hand in each meticulously executed painting. Kolosova makes working with such an unconventionally soft and unruly canvas seem effortless as each image pops and draws the viewer into the magical scene. At times, one forgets they are looking at a painting on the palm the artist’s hand and is simply left admiring the wonderful shades and shapes that Kolosova uses to put a picture to childhood stories.

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So…This shirt is made up of 6500 screws!

So...This shirt is made up of 6,500 screws!

Andrew Myers – A Laguna Beach-based artist stunned everyone with his unique works that were made by patiently drilling in 8,000 to 10,000 screws into plywood panel. Myers doesn’t rely on any computer software to guide him. Instead, he drills in screws at different depths all by instinct to create his magnificent 3-D portraits.

In his latest work, titled “It’s been a long day,” Myers made a 4 foot by 4 foot sculpture of a men’s dress shirt. It consists of 6,500 screws, oil paint, French newspaper clippings from the 1910’s to 30’s, and wood.

Myers recently redesigned his website. It includes, not only his trademark screw portraits, but also some thought-provoking bronze sculptures, as well. Hop on over there to see his full body of work.

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