Tagged: european

Architecture the Great! Office in Madrid helps employees feel apart of Great Mother nature.

It looks like something from the future but its 2014, its about time architecture looked as futuristic as this.

The brilliant aaerodynamic window tubed office, designed by Spanish architects Jose Selgas and Lucia Cano, allows its workers to feel as though they’re working in the middle of a Spanish forest. (This would have been the perfect back drop for the editors of Pans Labrynth).

Half of the office, which the two architects designed for their architecture firm Selgascano, is dug into the ground in a forest outside of Madrid. This ensures that the office stays cool even during the hot Spanish summers avoiding the feeling of being stuck in a green house.

A long window that curves up to the ceiling runs along the length of the office and eliminates the need for artificial lighting during the day. This window is also attached to a hinge and pulley mechanism that allows it to open up and keep the building ventilated. The other half of the building features an insulated fiberglass wall that helps shade the office’s workers from direct sunlight.

The office building’s sunken floor, along with the large and unusual window, means that employees sitting at their desks have an eye-level view of the forest floor. This is a company that really loves their employees!

This, combined with the view of the forest on one side and the sky above, make it seem like the office must be a fairly relaxing place to work.

There is something beautiful about these photos by Ester Grass Vergara

3D Mural Shows Opposite Reactions to Colorful Rain

3D Mural Shows Opposite Reactions to Colorful Rain

CMYK is a three-dimensional mural created by the Norway-based design collective, Skurktur. Using spray paints, stencils, and a variety of mixed media, the artists produced this playful scene in which a young child and a grown man react very differently to the colorful “rain” dripping down the side of the building. The flat stenciled shapes interact seamlessly with the drips of water and the half-umbrella protruding from the wall.

As the man rushes along to get to shelter, the young child stands with arms spread wide, exposed to the rain and embracing every drop with great joy and enthusiasm. The innocence of youth and the freedom of splattered paints are directly juxtaposed against the sullen posture and hurried scramble of adulthood. According to the website, the piece was used as part of a campaign for Ricomincia da Te, a movement promoting political and economic reform in Italy.

Skurktur5                    Skurktur2

Skurktur3                    Skurktur4