Tagged: photooftheday

The winning entry to build China’s Pavilion at the Milan Expo 2015 goes to…

The winning entry to build China’s Pavilion at the Milan Expo 2015 is a stunning reinterpretation of a public space. Designed in collaboration between Tsinghua University and New York-based Studio Link-Arc, the duo rejected the notion of a typical pavilion, and instead came up with a structure that resembles billowing fields of wheat. It’s a thoughtful and creative twist on the Expo’s theme, “Feeding the Planet – Energy for Life.” According to the architects, the 5,000-square-meter space entitledLand of Hope is centered around the idea that, “hope can be realized when nature and the city exist in harmony.”

The Pavilion’s floating roof plays a large role in capturing the spirit of the Expo. Conceptually, the undulating form merges the city skyline to the building’s north with the natural landscape to the south. It’s designed as a timber structure that references the raised-beam system found in traditional Chinese architecture, and is clad in bamboo shingled panels to reference the country’s terracotta roof construction.

Inside, there will be exhibitions and cultural offerings from the 40 Chinese provinces. The centerpiece of it all is the “field of hope,” a multimedia installation that’s a landscape of LED “stalks” meant to mimic the form of wheat. After visitors have taken in the Pavilion’s sights, sounds, and short films, they can stand on a raised platform outside and enjoy the expansive views of the Expo’s grounds.

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Architecture the Great! Office in Madrid helps employees feel apart of Great Mother nature.

It looks like something from the future but its 2014, its about time architecture looked as futuristic as this.

The brilliant aaerodynamic window tubed office, designed by Spanish architects Jose Selgas and Lucia Cano, allows its workers to feel as though they’re working in the middle of a Spanish forest. (This would have been the perfect back drop for the editors of Pans Labrynth).

Half of the office, which the two architects designed for their architecture firm Selgascano, is dug into the ground in a forest outside of Madrid. This ensures that the office stays cool even during the hot Spanish summers avoiding the feeling of being stuck in a green house.

A long window that curves up to the ceiling runs along the length of the office and eliminates the need for artificial lighting during the day. This window is also attached to a hinge and pulley mechanism that allows it to open up and keep the building ventilated. The other half of the building features an insulated fiberglass wall that helps shade the office’s workers from direct sunlight.

The office building’s sunken floor, along with the large and unusual window, means that employees sitting at their desks have an eye-level view of the forest floor. This is a company that really loves their employees!

This, combined with the view of the forest on one side and the sky above, make it seem like the office must be a fairly relaxing place to work.

The Friday 5 – Explosions, Che Guevara’s and Automobiles